Akron Soul Train: Full Steam Ahead

Akron Soul Train announces 2018-19 fellows; nearly doubles number of artists supported

CANVAS MAGAZINE, CLEVELAND – “After supporting a total of seven local artists since its inception in 2016, the Akron Soul Train announced its latest class of fellows would nearly double that figure.

Thirteen emerging and established artists will serve as Akron Soul Train fellows from September 2018 to August 2019, including the program’s first artist of color, first non-Ohioan and first two musicians, says Natalie Grieshammer, Akron Soul Train arts and programming manager.

The Akron Soul Train fellowship selection committee reviewed 70 applications. Each of the 13 selected will lead a community program during their fellowship as well as present a final exhibition or performance in Akron to share the artwork they created.

“Akron Soul Train is thrilled to be supporting so many new artists this fellowship round. Expanding the number of artists we support allows us to not only validate the role of excellent local and regional artists, but helps enrich the greater Akron arts landscape,” Grieshammer says. “Since each fellow will be creating and leading a community program, Akron area residents will have opportunities to engage with each artists’ unique creative perspective in ways that they may not usually get to.”…

Christa Ebert, of Cleveland, is a musician widely known as Uno Lady. She blends elements of jazz, doo wop, ’60s pop and folk through her voice, electronic pedals and unconventional instruments.” – By Marissa Nichol

 

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Uno Lady is an Akron Soul Train Fellow

I’m ecstatic to announce I’ve been named an Akron Soul Train fellow. It is a privilege and an honor to be a part of the fellowship program. Thank you for the opportunity to share my art and support my work.

“Akron Soul Train (AST) is thrilled to support 13 new local and regional artists from September 2018
through August 2019. The AST Fellowship Selection Committee reviewed 70 applications and selected a
wide variety of excellent visual and performing artists, ranging from emerging to more established. Each
artist will lead a community program during their fellowship as well as present a final exhibition or
performance in Akron to share the artwork they created.” – Akron Soul Train

 

 

May 20: One-Woman Band Uno Lady & Cartoon Music Sextet Play Ohio City House Concert

Cool Cleveland – “The Mechanic Street house concerts, held in the living room of Ohio City residents Joel Elvery and Lynn Phares generally feature Americana/roots-style artists from around the country, looking for intimate settings to play while on tour.

This week they’ll be hosting a pair of local artists they believe people ought to hear.

Christa Ebert aka Uno Lady constructs her intriguing earworms of tunes using by mixing and looping her own voice, adding layer after layer to create a billowing cloud of ethereal sound. She’s been developing her act for a decade, and won Cuyahoga Arts and Culture’s Creative Workforce Fellowship for her unusual approach to pop music.

By contrast to Ebert’s one-woman show, Powerhouse 5 features six noted Cleveland jazz musicians who will somehow shoehorn themselves into the living room to perform the music of Raymond Scott who composed classic cartoon music in the ’40s and ’50s and was a major influence on the entire genre with his offbeat, lighthearted compositions.

It’s a $20 suggested donation, all of which goes to the artists. To make a reserve and learn the exact location, email mechanicstreetmusic@yahoo.com. doors open at 6:30, music starts at 7pm.”

 

Applause Performances: Uno Lady on WCPN Ideastream

“When she sings, she sounds like an entire chorus of voices. But in reality, she’s performing solo.

Thanks to the wonders of today’s digital technology, Christa Ebert – AKA ‘Uno Lady’ – is able to overlap her voice in real time, creating catchy yet haunting music that’s truly unique.

Recently she submitted her latest video for NPR’s Tiny Desk contest, and while she didn’t win, her performance stood out for us among all the other submissions from Northeast Ohio.

So we invited ‘Uno Lady’ to our Key Bank studio for our April edition of  ‘Applause Performances,’ live on both 90.3 and our ideastream Facebook page starting at 12:40 p.m. ET.”  – By Dave DeOreo & Dan Polletta

Watch the video here

HBD Roy Orbison! Listen to Uno Lady’s Cover of “Crying”

Listen to Uno Lady’s cover of Roy Orbison’s “Crying.”

Friendly reminder of Uno Lady’s NPR performance, Thursday April 26, @12:40pm on the  Sound of Applause! You can listen live at 90.3 FM or stream at http://www.ideastream.org/live/wclv

 

Uno Lady LIVE on WCPN Ideastream Sound of Applause, April 26, 12:40pm

My beloved local NPR station has invited me to perform on a the Sound of Applause! You can listen live  at http://www.ideastream.org/live/wclv

The performance will also be streamed via Facebook live. Visit the 90.3 WCPN ideastream® Facebook page this THURSDAY, APRIL 26th at 12:40pm for a special Facebook Live Applause Performance.

Upcoming shows:

May 11 @ with Yonatan Gat, Ma Holos, at The Happy Dog West,  Doors @ 8:30 pm, $8 adv. $10 at door. Presale tickets can be purchased here: http://ticketf.ly/2FzT4qm

May 20 @ with Powerhouse 5 at Mechanic Street House Concert. Doors open at 6:30pm, music starts at 7:00pm, $20 suggested donation, tickets must be reserved in advance through http://www.mechanicstreetmusic.com

Music Monday: Watch Space Flower an Uno Lady Improv Performance

Improv audio synced to the scenery of California’s redwood forests.

Performance recorded March 6, 2017.  Filmed with a GOPRO in El Corte de Madera Creek Open Space Preserve in Redwood City, CA and around the giant sequoias of Calaveras Big Trees State Park in Arnold, CA.

Music was created with vocal through Earthquaker Devices effect pedals and Boss RC 30 loop pedal.

 

 

Cleveland Magazine: You Need To See This Vocal Looper In Action

Christa Ebert, also known as Uno Lady, puts on a performance that needs to be seen to be believed.
Whoever said you needed more than one person to form a band forgot to tell Christa Ebert. Performing under the moniker Uno Lady, this one-woman choir uses a microphone, small mixer and loop pedal perched on a podium to create an emotional musical experience. Each performance is a little bit different as Ebert, 35, uses her pedalboard to layer haunting melodies with syncopated beats on top of rich soundscapes to create her distinctly transportive music. With a record on the way this year, Ebert continues to create new sounds to entrance and mesmerize her audiences.
My earliest memories are of singing. I remember trying to organize a concert on the playground in the third grade. I have no choice but to sing. It’s a part of me.Uno Lady is basically myself, but a fancier version. I have always wanted to be in a band, but it just wasn’t happening. So I started to create music on my own. At my first gig at Pat’s in the Flats in 2007, I sang into my computer alongside a projection of an old drug education film to have a visual element. I would describe Uno Lady as a one-woman ghost choir, lush layers, captivating, mesmerizing, always spinning you into a musical web.My process has definitely evolved over the years. I started with a laptop and a microphone and then built my first homemade podium with a space for my computer and my loop pedals so I could build songs live and the audience could see me create.

Letting the audience see my process helps them get in the moment with me and be a part of a shared experience. Music is a way to connect with total strangers. It’s a way to find your tribe hundreds of miles from your home. I really appreciate when someone shares their attention and is open to experience the performance with me. It makes us feel like we’re in it together.

Sometimes after the show, people will share that I reached them or inspired them to create their own music.

I had a tough biker guy once tell me I made him cry. I had written a song called “Ash Wednesday” about a tragic fire that happened in Lakeview Elementary School in 1908. I told that biker guy, “I’m sorry, and you’re welcome.”

During a show, I get caught up in the moment, lost in the music, and I’m part of that place and time where everything floats by. Ideally, I reach a good flow and nothing is going through my head except the music. But it took a lot of work and discipline to get to that space. I used to have intense stage fright. Nerves are proof that I am challenging myself, trying something new and growing as a person.

At the end of a concert, I want audiences to know that they are not alone and that someone understands them. They can do whatever they want to do. — as told to Ken Schneck

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